Pan European Networks - Horizon 2020 - page 11

EU ANNOUNCES FIRST
H2020-FUNDED ERA CHAIRS
B
RUSSELS: 13 universities, technical
institutes and private organisations from
EU member states with a high potential for
research excellence are each to receive up to
€2.5m in Union funding to boost their research
capacity through the appointment of ERA Chairs.
The financing, provided by the European Commission under Horizon 2020,
will enable the institutions to attract top academics so that they can compete
with centres of excellence elsewhere in the European Research Area (ERA).
The new chairs will be located in Estonia, Croatia, Cyprus, Poland, Portugal
and Romania, and 88 proposals were submitted for evaluation.
Commenting, Carlos Moedas, European Commissioner for Research, Science
and Innovation, said: “To make European research the best in the world, we
need to unlock the potential in all parts of Europe. With the new ERA Chairs
we are helping promising regions
attract the best research talent and
strengthen their standing as
research excellence centres.”
The aim of the ERA Chairs scheme
is to bridge Europe’s innovation
divide between low and high
research-performing countries.
Once recruited, the ERA Chairs and their teams will perform research in a
wide spectrum of scientific fields, including solar thermal energy,
supramolecular chemistry, clinical genomics and educational innovation.
A group of 15 EU member states are eligible to host ERA Chairs, namely
each country that joined the Union after 2004, plus Portugal and
Luxembourg; eight of the non-EU countries associated to Horizon 2020
can also benefit from the scheme. Last year, the Commission
announced the funding of 11 ERA Chairs as part of a pilot call under
the Seventh Framework Programme.
16 February 2015
ERC PLACES SCIENCE IN THE
‘NEW GLOBAL CONTEXT’ AT WEF
S
WITZERLAND: The 45th World Economic
Forum has opened in Davos, with this
year’s theme of ‘The New Global Context’.
On the eve of the conference, European Commissioner for Research,
Science and Innovation, Carlos Moedas, commented: “We are here in
Davos to discuss how to keep Europe on the map. I am pleased that the
European Research Council (ERC) is participating in the summit as it
shows how important excellent frontier research is, not only for Europe’s
competitiveness, but also to tackle a range of global issues, from climate
change to social inequality and energy security. Researchers must be
inspired to take risks and follow their curiosity to find new solutions to
such problems in the long term.”
ERC president Professor
Jean-Pierre Bourguignon
will take part in various
events at the conference,
along with 11 ERC-funded
researchers, including
Nobel laureates Professor
Sir Konstantin Novoselov and Professor Sir Christopher Pissarides.
Adding his thoughts before the summit, Bourguignon said: “I am thrilled to
see so many ERC grantees at Davos who will share their groundbreaking
research at the frontiers of knowledge and their enriching experience as
scientists. They are amongst the thousands of top researchers already
funded by the ERC across Europe, whose ideas spark innovation and drive
progress. By backing some of the best, the ERC has proved to be a key
ingredient in keeping Europe competitive in the global arena.”
21 January 2015
FORMER CSA STILL LOOKING
TO CONTRIBUTE TO EU
UK
: Professor Anne Glover, the former
EU chief scientific adviser (CSA)
appointed by José Manuel Barroso,
has said she received a mixed reception during
her time in Brussels.
Glover made the comments on the BBC News programme HARDtalk, her
first extensive interview since leaving the post. She said she experienced
opposition from some established European Commission staff members
to a role that was judged to have been “parachuted in”.
She commented: “Many people in the Commission felt there was suitable and
sufficient scientific advice whichwas available…many commissioners would
have felt they had a role which was important and that they should give
scientific advice. But I think there
was amisunderstanding of the role.”
Glover argued more could have
been accomplished if “people had
been more open to the possibilities
that my role would give to the
Commission in strengthening and making more transparent how scientific
advice or evidence is used to underpin policy.”
The former CSA said she had asked to meet new Commission President
Jean-Claude Juncker or a member of his team, but never got a response,
adding it was up to him to decide the future nature of independent
scientific advice.
Glover concluded: “I have had three fantastic years at the Commission,
working with great people and have thoroughly enjoyed it. I am a committed
European, so any help I can provide, I want to do that.”
3 February 2015
©European Union,2015
© ines s.
© European Union,2015
N E W S D E S K
H O R I Z O N 2 0 2 0 P R O J E C T S : P O R TA L
I S S U E S I X
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