Pan European Networks - Horizon 2020 - page 45

what the action groups, in terms of deliverables, … have done and how
that is feeding in.
“We have recently circulated data on assessment tools because the
partners really want to see … the work around assessing innovation,
assessing practices in a way that is useful for them to scale up and take
lessons learnt,” Manning continued.
“Assessment tools, decision tools, implementation tools – you can really
see from the regions who want to scale up and want to deploy innovative
services in active and healthy ageing that there are a lot of
implementation tools out there, procurement funding … that’s just an
initial stage of work in 2015 that’s really partner-led. This all ties into the
work that we have talked about a lot in the partnership on repositories
and good practice and showcasing initiatives.
“At the moment, we will try to deliver on this repository as part of the
projects’ work, and there are various working groups set up to make it
happen, to discuss functionalities, the assessment criteria … and then
to test the prototypes. It is something that we are currently starting with,
so it’s under development.”
Manning concluded her short address by stating her hope for further
synergies between the work undertaken by the EIP-AHA and JA-CHRODIS.
The EIP-AHA has made good progress since its creation. With an
emphasis on addressing the innovation gap, feeding into the priorities
of Horizon 2020 and building close ties with JA-CHRODIS, the benefits
of the partnership are significant. With a grassroots strategy, true potential
can be harnessed at multiple levels throughout the EU.
Delivering a presentation on the EIP-AHA,
Manning began by defining the work of the
partnership, drawing attention to its action
groups and its co-operative nature. She said
that whilst the EIP was set up by the EU, “it’s
not a funded project like JA-CHRODIS – it is a
voluntary commitment of projects across
Europe who come together to work and to see
what they can produce from that.
“What we see is that it’s really a stakeholder-
led instrument,” Manning told delegates. “It’s
from the bottom up – it’s not the European
Commission coming in and saying ‘these
specific areas’ … it’s a stakeholder-led
experience and it’s all about mutual learning
and sharing knowledge in the partnership.
“In the past few years, the groups have come
up with a number of areas of collaborative
work, so we have got work on screening tools
and original maturity models.”
Manning then discussed the importance of
collaboration, taking the integrated care action
group as an example. She drew attention to
how the group “set up a collaborative network”
and has “developed a memorandum of
understanding between regions on integrative
care” during its work so far.
“All this is towards the idea of scaling up, and
we have seen evidence of this in this integrated
care group, for instance on an airways
integrated care pathway that they are really
working on and scaling up together among
partners across Europe.”
New tools
Manning also emphasised the importance of
implementation, particularly in 2015, before
then detailing some of the next developments
of the EIP, including the creation of a new
monitoring tool: “By the summer, we will already
have a pilot tool for partners to test, to see how
they measure their interventions against those
broad goals; that will hopefully be a tool to be
used on an individual basis by partners, as well.
“There is a lot of evidence that we have
collected in the last two to three years. We did
an initial good practice book in 2013, but then
we have built up databases on various areas
that we are working on, and we have got the
evidence from the reference sites … and from
B R OW S E
H O R I Z O N
2 0 2 0
H O R I Z O N 2 0 2 0 P R O J E C T S : P O R TA L
I S S U E S I X
45
N E U R O D E G E N E R AT I O N
The EIP is introducing
a new monitoring
tool to assess its
progress so far
© PublicDomainPictures
1...,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44 46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,...244
Powered by FlippingBook