Pan European Networks - Horizon 2020 - page 74

graphene and carbon nanostructures. Her
breakthroughs include the material’s
characterisation by Raman spectroscopy, and
Casiraghi, along with her research group, is
now focusing on superlattices and
heterostructures. With investigations into 2D
crystals and thin films, it is hoped that new
devices for flexible electronics could be
developed; prototypes of touchscreen panels,
photovoltaics, organic light-emitting diodes,
and tunnelling transistors have already
been constructed.
Casiraghi’s success in this field was recognised
by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) with
the presentation of the annual Marlow Award
in 2014. The £2,000 (~€2,800) award
recognises ‘meritorious contributions to
physical chemistry or chemical physics’ and the
winner is selected by the RSC’s Faraday
Division Awards Committee.
Reflecting on the major advances in graphene
over the last ten years, Portal spoke to
Casiraghi, who is also the conference chair and
scientific organiser of Graphene Week 2015,
which will take place at the University of
Manchester later this year.
How would you define the greatest
achievements in graphene
nanotechnology over the last
ten years?
There have been significant achievements over
the last decade. When we started working with
this very small-sized material, just a few
microns, it was very difficult to develop new
devices because of the specimens. Recognising
this, one of the greatest achievements relates
to chemical vapour deposition, a process in
which graphene can be grown on a much larger
scale on copper and then transferred to any
substrate. The potential to grow this material
means it is compatible with electronics and
IN
just ten years, the industrial landscape has seen a
dramatic transformation with the invention of
graphene. The first commercial products using this
incredible material are just about to hit the market and
demonstrate the considerable opportunities in both designing and
producing new goods.
Graphene’s home is Manchester, UK, after it was isolated by Professor
Sir Andre Geim and Professor Dr Sir Kostya Novoselov at the university’s
physics school. Discovered on simple Sellotape that was used to remove
layers of graphite, once obsolete byproduct, the university saw the
creation of the first manmade two-dimensional material and gave way
to the dawn of a major material revolution. Such is the power and
opportunity of graphene that both Geim and Novoselov were awarded
the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics “for groundbreaking experiments
regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Its properties include
being thin, light and in possession of enormous potential that cannot be
underestimated.
Working on the capacity of this ‘wonder material’ since its inception
is the University of Manchester’s Dr Cinzia Casiraghi, leader in
I S S U E S I X
H O R I Z O N 2 0 2 0 P R O J E C T S : P O R TA L
74
G R A P H E N E R E S E A R C H
A decade of graphene
The University of Manchester’s
Dr Cinzia Casiraghi,
chair of Graphene Week
2015, details the top advances of the ‘wonder material’ over the last decade
and the important role of the Graphene Flagship
Dr Cinzia Casiraghi
The ‘wonder material’
is expected to
revolutionise many
electronic devices
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