Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  120 / 280 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 120 / 280 Next Page
Page Background

support individual countries’ efforts and to

provide common building blocks.’

While the recognition of blue biotechnology’s

potential may be in its infancy, the interest that

it is attracting and the results that are already

emerging mean that it is a rapidly developing

field, with advances already being made in

numerous areas and with promising results. As

such, and with the additional assistance

leveraged through Horizon 2020, this progress

should now continue to gather momentum, and

Europe’s seas, what Commissioner Vella

referred to as “a bountiful source of nutritious

food, medicine, minerals and renewable

energy” in his address on European Maritime

Day, can continue to offer this bounty whilst also

enjoying the level of protection necessary for

this to be sustainable.

a worldwide sustainable and low impact economy in developing a new

range of third-generation applications such as bioenergy, biofuels

(including jet fuels), animal feeding, all sorts of bio-based products (such

as bioplastics, biocosmetics, biosolvents, etc.) and also human nutrition.

Their high oil and biomass yields, widespread availability, lack of (or very

reduced) competition with agricultural land, high quality and versatility

of the byproducts, high protein content, their efficient use as a means to

capture CO

2

, and their suitability for wastewater treatments and other

industrial plants make algae and aquatic biomass one of the most

promising and attractive renewable sources for a fully sustainable and

low carbon economy portfolio.

Appreciation

Of the five key areas highlighted by the Commission as being

fundamental in delivering sustainable growth, blue biotechnology is

perhaps the least developed, and the unexplored and little studied Nature

of much of the underwater world means that the economic potential of

marine organisms other than fish and shellfish is only just beginning to

be appreciated.

‘However,’ the magazine continues, ‘recent research has helped us to

understand how organisms that can withstand extremes of temperature

and pressure and grow without light could be used to develop enzymes

used in food production and pharmaceuticals, or develop vaccines for

farmed fish.

‘Among the barriers to growth is a lack of collaboration between the

public and private sectors, the inability to transfer research results into

goods and services, and a skills shortage. While member states need to

adopt policies to address these problems, the EU strategy is designed to

I S S U E S E V E N

H O R I Z O N 2 0 2 0 P R O J E C T S : P O R TA L

www.horizon2020projects.com

B R OW S E

http://ec.europa.eu/research/bioecono my/biotechnology/ http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/po licy/blue_growth/

H O R I Z O N

2 0 2 0

120

B I O T E C H N O L O G Y F O R H E A L T H

© Steve Jurvetson

Rows of microalgae

containers taking

CO

2

from the air to

make fuels, chemicals

and food