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Further, there are already many questions being

generated amongst colleagues designing the

programme on the pioneer side: is it

appropriate and acceptable in the English

context?; what are we doing to identify

individuals at risk?; and what are the key

structural and contextual issues that those who

are pre-diabetic are faced with, so that the

programme can take account of this?

Such questions are already emerging as we are

considering implementation in England. Having

a parallel research track to stimulate

understanding of the issues is going to be

important. We are hoping that by building in

research alongside implementation we will be

able to contribute to the global literature, and

especially the European literature, which we

think will be of enormous benefit to our

European partners.

Amidst worrying signs that the

diabetes epidemic will continue to

worsen, are you confident that it

can potentially be brought under

control in the future?

The reality is that the diabetes epidemic is

being driven by obesity in the population. With

prescriptive in having the same programme in every locality across the

country and to instead set overarching parameters, core principles and

outcomes, then let local partners look at local assets and local

relationships to design a programme that can reach those outcomes.

We are also looking to use performance management or support systems

to help the localities reach the result outcomes. That is a key lesson that

we have been able to bring to the design of the programme that will

enable greater ownership and then a greater level of effectiveness.

We are also developing a suite of structured process outcome indicators

to help us understand how the programme is being designed, developed

and implemented. This will help us to understand if we are meeting the

key indicators for success. That systematic evaluation is a part of what

we do for all of our prevention programmes.

In terms of research, how important a role does this

play in helping to combat Type 2 diabetes and develop

public health policies?

Our academic partners are key for us as we embark on this programme.

We didn’t want to simply take the American and Australian approach and

move towards implementation; there is a huge research agenda here.

We use research to inform the implementation of the programme and

have some approaches that we can use to structure this in a phased

way. That will enable us to learn about the effectiveness of the

programme in the real world setting.

That application of good science methodology can help us to carry out

a better job of implementation.

I S S U E S E V E N

H O R I Z O N 2 0 2 0 P R O J E C T S : P O R TA L

www.horizon2020projects.com

156

M E TA B O L I C D I S E A S E S

Increased activity in

the population is key

to curbing diabetes