Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  205 / 280 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 205 / 280 Next Page
Page Background

investment and, in 2020 and 2030, needs to keep those energy intensive

industries in mind.”

Wolff added that it is important to explore the “whole area of demand

management”, with a focus on the deployment of renewables, and to

“utilise the productivity of renewable generation”.

“You need to get away from regulatory hurdles,” he said. “You need to

create some incentives and some investment in processes that are

needed to provide the appropriate flexibility. It needs a push and a political

framework in which it can thrive.”

It is clear from Wolff’s words the immense potential and influence that

the EU has in encouraging countries around the world to play their role

in combatting climate change, and the Union’s authority will be closely

assessed by policy makers and media commentators when world leaders

gather in Paris in December.

The Union is also taking steps to encourage industry to realise the

benefits and the balance of investing in green technology whilst at the

same time embracing sustainability. Policies and investment frameworks

such as NER 300, the ETS and Horizon 2020 are having varying degrees

of success, but it will be up to the new European Commission to

demonstrate the Union’s full potential.

investment policies are we able to open those

markets and establish momentum on the

ground, creating new products to redesign our

value chains.”

Wolff then drew attention to industries where

innovation is key to helping maintain long term

international competitiveness whilst also

realising environmentally friendly attributes: “A

study was completed with the chemical industry

last year which showed that the sector is still in

a global leadership position, despite higher

energy prices than in the United States. There

are many innovations being captured, but you

need to take an innovative value chain approach

and we need to look into other industries.

“In the construction industry, there is a need

for innovative materials, whilst in the car

industry, there is a need for lightweight

materials, so there are many new markets

opening up. If the EU can continue to keep

innovative leadership in those traditional

business sectors, this would be a very

attractive model to follow for other countries.”

Convincing industry

Moving forward, Wolff commented that

traditional industries are beginning to recognise

the benefits of a low carbon economy, though

two major steps need to be taken.

“Firstly, we need to look at the ETS and secure

the investment into decarbonisation; there is

under-investment and it’s not fast enough. If

you look into the very early innovative lab

stages, plans on how to green the steel

production, on how to change processes

around cement, how to deploy renewable

energy in paper production, etc., this is all

happening, but it needs to be supported in

order to keep these developments in Europe.

“Secondly, we need to look again, as the

Commission has recognised, at CCS – not only

for utilities but for industry, as well, and we will

see this in the spirit of the circular economy. If

you build industrial CCS clusters to actually be

deployed, and not just to work in enhanced oil

recovery solutions, this actually becomes a

competitive industry. Yet the Commission needs

to revise the ETS policies around leakage and

DrChristophWolff

European Climate Foundation

B R OW S E

www.europeanclimate.org www.ebsummit.eu

H O R I Z O N

2 0 2 0

www.horizon2020projects.com

H O R I Z O N 2 0 2 0 P R O J E C T S : P O R TA L

I S S U E S E V E N

205

S O C I E TA L C H A L L E N G E S : C L I M AT E A C T I O N

The EU will play a

leading role at the

COP21 talks in

furthering global action

to combat and adapt to

climate change